What is real
is not external form.



CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI

Transliteration of a brand in Chinese

28.09.2018


As the largest economy in the world and with the largest population, China is a very attractive market for foreign companies, but it is not easy to enter there.

 

You should know that every foreign company in order to enter on the Chinese market must follow some other steps besides application for the registration of its Latin trademark in China. Among them, the need to design the corresponding Chinese trademark, apply for its registration in a timely manner to adapt to the cognitive custom of Chinese consumers and exploit the Chinese market.

 

You should also translate your brand into Chinese, design corresponding Chinese trademarks, conduct trademark searches and apply for the registration of the Chinese trademarks in China in a timely manner for the purpose of use and protection.

 

To increase your chances of approval simultaneously apply for registration of several alternative Chinese trademarks in case one or more of them might fail in obtaining registration.

 

 

Transliteration in short

 

One way of translating your brand in Chinese is by transliteration. This means the translation is based on the sonority of your brand’s name. Each Chinese character has a corresponding sound transcribed in pinyin (alphabetic and phonetic transcription system of Chinese ideograms), so you can use this method to transcribe any brand by using characters with similar sounds. It is a fast and easy solution.

 

By translating that way only the sound will be taken into account. Therefore, your translation may be meaningless or at least strange, considering each character has particular meaning. However, the Chinese will still be able to pronounce the name of your brand and make the connection with the Latin name of it. But you still have to check the final pronunciation of your brand name in mandarin does not have a homonym meaning something that can jeopardize the image of your brand.

 

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