What is real
is not external form.



CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI

How to protect your brand on social networks when you license?

20.04.2018


A fundamental principle of trademark law is that the owner of the trademark must control its use. But what happens when you license to a third party?

 

Advertising, a special chapter of the licensing contract

Quality control can become more difficult when the licensor allows others to produce goods or provide services using their own brand. A serious problem is that if the brand’s dealer uses it in advertising in an unauthorized manner, this can damage the reputation of the brand. If the licensor does not control the advertisement, he may find that an unqualified or unsatisfied dealer has published content that is not compatible with the image that the owner of the mark wishes to convey or, worse, that the owner distorts the nature of the mark. In addition, a licensee may publish content that inadvertently infringes the trademark or other publicity rights of others, exposing the trademark owner to litigation and possible damages.

To avoid this type of problem, most license agreements require the brand owner to pre-approve all ads bearing the brand name. The licensee must submit to the licensor all publications where he wants to promote the trademark, the licensor then has a certain period of time to approve them, usually between 10 and 15 days. This system works well for print, radio and television advertising.

For more details, please follow the link 🙂 https://goo.gl/pktxvj

02.07.2020

Readying your brand for your local area

An early part of the brand development process includes researching your competitors and comparing your brand against theirs. It’s possible that your business and its accompanying intellectual property share striking similarities to other brands in your industry, and these are important to consider when it comes to standing out within your field. When you’ve completed ( learn more )

25.06.2020

The similarity between a croissant and a sandwich? The name itself

Lately, we have been working on a new case so that both the commercial name of a croissant and a sandwich can coexist without legal implications. In this sense, we witnessed the negotiation and conclusion of a coexistence agreement for the two brands. Our client, from the Bakery and confectionery industry, received a coexistence agreement ( learn more )

18.06.2020

Covid 19 and its effects on Intellectual Property

Our colleague, Ana Rotariu, is sharing her experience regarding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic over businesses and their IP. Interested to know how has this outbreak affected companies worldwide? It is safe to say we are all experiencing challenging times, especially when it comes to businesses, either big or small. Even as countries and ( learn more )